Archives: NASCAR

By Jeffrey S. Kravitz, Esquire

The NHL just announced that all games are cancelled until the New Year. Like marriages, labor quarrels are very tough to analyze from the outside. What I do know is that hockey fans always poll up there with NASCAR fans as the most committed to their sport. What I also know is what Canadian author also noted (with a disclaimer as to his comments on French Canadians):

Canadians are actually the most tolerant of foreigners. Mordecai Riccler said "Canada is not so much a country as a holding tank filled with the disgruntled progeny of defeated peoples. French-Canadians consumed by self-pity; the descendants of Scots who fled the Duke of Cumberland; Irish, the famine; and Jews, the Black Hundreds. Then there are the peasants from Ukraine, Poland, Italy and Greece, convenient to grow wheat and dig out the ore and swing the hammers and run the restaurants, but otherwise to be kept in their place. Most of us are huddled tight to the border, looking into the candy store window, scared of the Americans on one side and of the bush on the other."

-Mordecai Richter

 

With all of the present political problems, I still wish that the President (under Taft-Hartley) and the Prime Minister could order them back to work. That would be reaching across the aisle as well as across the border.

 

 

On January 22, 2010, in the article "NASCAR attempting to energize sport," ESPN.com reported that NASCAR lifted restrictions on bump-drafting and increase horsepower in an effort to juice up the sport for the fans.  The bump-drafting restriction was placed in 1989. 

Basically, NASCAR drivers are now assuming the risk for any injuries resulting from bump-drafting and more ponies.  Although the doctrine of assumption of risk varies from state to state, it basically says that where an injured person either expressly or impliedly assumes a risk in an activity, that person relieves the person who caused the injury from liability.  This means NASCAR drivers who suffer accidents from bump-drafting cannot sue the drivers causing them.  Of course, this is not a license to injure as bump-drafting does not equal crashing.   

So NASCAR drivers will exchange higher accident risks for higher ratings and attendance.  This will definitely spice up NASCAR in a gloomy economy.  It will also lead NASCAR closer to becoming a "contact" sport, like football or boxing.  Maybe one day after a race is over, drivers can take their gloves off and fight a la NHL.