By Jeffrey S. Kravitz, Esq.

Johnny Manziel is putting up numbers for Texas A&M that make him, if not the odds on favorite for the Heisman, at least a face that we will see at the New York Athletic Club when the award is given. And why not? Does anyone doubt that Kareem Abdul Jabbar was the best collegian in the land as a freshman or Bill Walton?


In those days, freshman were not even eligible to play varsity ball, but Johnny Football sure looks good for a kid you never heard of coming into this season. As the sentiment in the Dallas Morning News Blog has it, why not? In private law firms, freshman are most often relegated to the back room (my firm excepted) but in public employment, they often hand you a file and say "try this case."  As a young pup, I faced a veteran trial lawyer on a civil rights case who had a big reputation. I was too green to know who he was and my bosses let me run with it. Beat him to everyone’s surprise, I had a senior lawyer who did not want to try cases any more hand me a file, only to have me find out that I was facing the man known as the Desert Fox. Always loved the quote from Hall of Fame baseballer Dizzy Dean  "It ain’t braggin’ if you can do it."

As featured in, an enterprising young undergraduate at Ohio State University has been selling McNutt for Heisman t-shirts at $11 each.

Seems that neither the New York Athletic Club, which owns the intellectual property rights to the Heisman, nor OSU (ditto on Ohio State) were thrilled with this promotion. Cease-and-desist letters were sent and the campaign ended. Obviously, 40,000 OSU students are free to write “McNutt for Heisman” on their t-shirts, but a commercial enterprise runs afoul of copyright and trademark laws. Maybe McNutt should start a candy bar.