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Tag Archives: ncaa

Anti-Trust and College Athletics: Round One Goes To The Student-Athletes

Posted in Sports Business and the Law

  As we dig through the 99-page opinion in O’Bannon v. NCAA here at the Sports Law Scoreboard, we’re keeping in mind that this is only the trial court opinion of one judge.  Next stop will be the Ninth Circuit, which is likely to be sensitive to the students’ claims as well.  Final stop (if settlement is not achieved, of course)… Continue Reading

NCAA Halts Sales of Team-Related Merchandise on its Website

Posted in Sports Business and the Law

This guest post is authored by Tamarra J. Holmes.  Tamarra is an associate in our Litigation practice, resident in the Princeton, NJ office.  She can be reached at tholmes@foxrothschild.com. The NCAA announced on Thursday, August 8, that it would no longer sell team-related merchandise through its website, ShopNCAASports.com. The revelation came after ESPN analyst, Jay… Continue Reading

Perhaps Maryland Should Join the Atlantic “Sun” (of FGCU Fame): State Schools, Open Meetings Laws and Confidentiality Agreements

Posted in Sports Business and the Law

In the ever changing world of NCAA conference realignment, one school, the University of Maryland, forgot about its obligations under the “Sunshine Law.” Maryland’s flagship public university, like all public bodies, must comply with open meetings requirements. So, when Maryland’s Board of Regents met on November 18 and 19 of 2012 to discuss what would… Continue Reading

Exceptional Insurance: Safeguarding the Superstar

Posted in Sports Business and the Law

By Jeffrey S. Kravitz, Esquire & Sekou Campbell, Esquire Sam Kahn, Jr. of ESPN Radio recently reported that Johnny Manziel is exploring the option of "Exceptional Student-Athlete Disability Insurance," provided by the NCAA. The insurance coverage is reported to be routinely sought by players in Manziel’s position. Insurance, a frequent theme on this blog, poses interesting… Continue Reading

Notre Dame No. 1 On & Off the Field

Posted in Sports Business and the Law

Relating to prior posts on this blog here, here, and here, the Chronicle of Higher Education points out that Notre Dame demonstrates how athletic excellence need not always compromise academic excellence.

SHOULD FRESHMEN BE ELIGIBLE FOR THE HEISMAN?

Posted in Sports History

By Jeffrey S. Kravitz, Esq. Johnny Manziel is putting up numbers for Texas A&M that make him, if not the odds on favorite for the Heisman, at least a face that we will see at the New York Athletic Club when the award is given. And why not? Does anyone doubt that Kareem Abdul Jabbar… Continue Reading

California Covering College Athletes More Completely

Posted in Sports Business and the Law

Schools and the NCAA have attempted to raise college athlete graduation rates, a subject of a previous post here.  California Governor Jerry Brown recently signed a law designed to further address the graduation rate woes in certain college athletic programs, at least for four schools in his state (UCLA, USC, Stanford, and UC Berkley).  The… Continue Reading

Speech Establishing Religion or Free Expression?

Posted in Sports Business and the Law

The tumult in the world today surrounding speech and religion reverberates in the sports world.  Specifically, the Freedom from Religion Foundation wrote the Chancellor of University of Tennessee, a public university, “urg[ing the University] to discontinue the practice of opening football games…with prayer.”  According to the letter, an announcer at Tennessee’s home games asks all… Continue Reading

Students or employees?

Posted in Labor & Employment, Sports Business and the Law

Education is a unique commodity. Beyond the ability to earn more in the marketplace, education has an intrinsic value. It gives individuals the tools to more fully engage the entire observed world psychologically, personally, professionally, politically, and philosophically. Few other endeavors so dramatically expand rather than diminish returns of investment over time. Thus, questions of compensation in the school setting pose particular… Continue Reading

Time to Prepare: A Critique of the NCAA 2016 Academic Requirements

Posted in Sports Business and the Law

Despite growth in graduation rates among college student athletes overall, basketball and football student-athletes graduate students at a rate 15% lower than their other sports’ counterparts. To improve graduation rates, the NCAA recently announced that its standards would rise starting with this year’s high school freshmen. The NCAA seized on "college preparedness” as a way to improve graduation rates. Class of 2016 student-athletes will have to complete 16… Continue Reading

Concussions Lawsuit: Another Headache for the NCAA

Posted in Sports Business and the Law

Just last month, Adrian Arrington, a former strong safety on Eastern Illinois University’s (EIU) football team who suffered memory loss, seizures, and other symptoms caused by the several concussions he suffered while a student-athlete, filed a class action lawsuit against the NCAA for, among other counts, negligence and fraudulent concealment.  Arrington alleges the NCAA failed… Continue Reading

Dodging a Bullet

Posted in Sports History

Richard Williams was the Swiss tennis champion and one of the survivors of the Titanic. He went on to be NCAA singles champion. Talk about dodging the bullet…..As a pup lawyer and a Deputy Attorney General, I defended a civil rights case filed in propia persona by one James Von Brunn. We won and years later… Continue Reading

Toward a Standard of Equals

Posted in Education

As featured on NYTimes.com’s article, “N.C.A.A.’s Double Standard,” there is a divergence of opinion as to whether NCAA has one standard or two. Ohio State is forfeiting title from 2010 and it does not get much bigger than that. On top of USC sanctions, it sure appears there is a new sheriff in town.

Man-Child No More

Posted in Education, Sports History

In rivals.com’s article, “Kentucky flopped in the classroom in Calipari’s first season,” two items caught our eye. First, John Calipari’s Kentucky basketball team got barely passing grades in the classroom.  School is not for everyone, and it appears time for the NBA and NCAA to huddle on the "one and done" rule, particularly when the best… Continue Reading